The Resurrection of Lady Gaga

The Resurrection of Lady Gaga

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Quite like our saviour Jesus Christ, Lady Gaga effectively allowed herself to be crucified upon the release of Joanne. Fickle gays became her Judas Iscariot, betraying her in the Garden of Streaming, as only her devoted disciples, her Little Monsters remained weeping as their leader’s career seemed destined to rest in a Tomb of Mediocrity for the rest of time.

But last Sunday, on one of the most important days of the year, an incredible event occurred: Lady Gaga appeared in the sky, visible to all the world, singing a message of unity and hope as the stars danced in the sky around her. Her devoted disciples checked the Tomb of Mediocrity and found the stone which had covered its entrance laid on the floor, broken in two, and the body of Lady Gaga was nowhere to be found.

The disciples looked to the sky to see Lady Gaga descending, dressed in a glorious jewel-encrusted sleeved leotard to land on a large totem. Shocked by the return of the idol they believed to be dead, singing some of her most beloved Psalms, they rejoiced beneath her as the earth shook and adoring crowds roared. The day shall go down in history as The Resurrection of Lady Gaga.

To date, 18 million people have watched The Resurrection of Lady Gaga, which thankfully was captured on film to be remembered for all eternity. You can watch it here:

Like Jesus, the forty days following Lady Gaga’s resurrection will be among some of the most important in her career. She has already proved this with the release of the John Wayne video. A return to the aesthetic of her imperial phase; frenetic, gaudy and aggressive. Performing miracles, in the form of her own stunts, Gaga proved that she won’t give up without a fight. The wild colours, over-saturation, and crazy outfits of an earlier era are back. Gone are the muted colours we came to expect from the Joanne era.

‘John Wayne’, as I mentioned in my review of Joanne upon-release, “sees Gaga imitating herself, creating a country-pop reworking of ‘Teeth’ on which she screams about how much she loves cowboys.” And it’s the screaming that’s the most important thing to note in this choice of third single. Aside from ‘Perfect Illusion’ it’s the most uptempo, synth-heavy track on the album. It’s clear that Gaga has learned from her foray into a more subtle canvas, that to win back her formerly loyal fan base, she needs to forget about subtlety.

If, like Jesus, Gaga is to ascend to Heaven, she must continue on this righteous path in an effort to regain her former prominence and success. But what else does Joanne have to offer in the way of potential hits? As I see it, she has three options…

‘A-Yo’, has the most potential for imperial phase Gaga bonkers video treatment and radio success. It’s a bass-heavy, bombastic track with dirty, raw electric guitar riffs and certainly continues the uptempo pace as Gaga belts about getting the crowd revved up with her new sound.

‘Hey Girl (Feat. Florence Welch)’  could be incredible enough visually to attract a wider audience, thanks to a boost from the Florence & The Machine fan base. But something about the track is lacking… It’s essentially a semi-modern reworking of Elton John’s ‘Bennie & The Jets’ – a synth-led funk track that would fit right in on a Prince album.

Or, she throws a wild card in ‘Angel Down’. In these turbulent times, I expected Lady Gaga to be more vocal. Pretty dark, and bordering on biblical, ‘Angel Down’ discusses the breakdown of society, a message that is certainly as poignant as ever. It would be a risky strategy that could easily backfire, as well as alienating casual listeners. But, it could become the anthem of a nation.

My money is on Gaga and her team taking minimal risks, and playing it super-safe with a video and single treatment for ‘A-Yo’. I just hope whatever card she plays next, it’s a solid effort, and an effective one. We certainly need pop acts like Lady Gaga, and she has the potential to deliver greatness for many years to come, if only we give her the chance…

‘Joanne’ is available to download from iTunes or stream from Spotify and Apple Music.

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